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Butternut Squash Sausage Rolls

Butternut Squash Sausage Rolls

A perfect winter warmer and a great dish to serve up to friends and family. These vegan sausage rolls hit the spot when it comes to comfort food. Freeze them uncooked for convenience or prep with this recipe as it makes 6 servings and will keep for 3 days when refrigerated or up to a month frozen.

  • Cuisine: Vegan
  • Preparation Time: 30 Mins
  • Cooking Time: 50 Mins
  • Total time: 80 Mins
  • Servings: Makes 6 Portions
  • Allergens: Cereal, Soya
  • Storage: Refrigerate for up to 3 days when cooked or freeze when uncooked for up to 1 month!

Ingredients

  • 340g Diced Butternut Squash (Cut in half, peel and remove the seeds).
  • 70g Baby Leaf Spinach (Wash and dry)
  • 2 Cloves of Fresh Garlic (Peel and finely dice)
  • One Small Red Onion (Peel and fine dice)
  • 5ml Dark Gluten Free Soy Sauce
  • 220g of  Tinned Butter Beans – Approx 1 Can (Drained and washed)
  • A Small Handful of Fresh Coriander (stems removed and finely chop)
  • A Small Handful of Fresh Basil (stems removed and finely chop)
  • Fresh Thyme (stems removed and finely chop)
  • 15ml Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 225g Puff Pastry Sheets (21cm x 40cm)
  • 10ml Almond Milk
  • 100g Natural Breadcrumbs
  • Salt and Pepper

Equipment Needed

  • Chef’s knife
  • Sauce pan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Large bakings trays x 2
  • Large mixing bowls
  • Food processor
  • Pastry brush
  • Baking parchment
  • Scales

Method

  • Put 340g of diced butternut squash onto 2 baking trays and coat with 10ml of olive oil and finely chopped thyme. Season with salt and pepper and roast on 200°C for 30 minutes (swap the trays round halfway through).
  • Heat a thick-based saucepan over a medium heat and add 5ml of cold pressed olive oil. Once the oil is hot add the red onion and garlic and gently fry until the onion is golden and soft.
  • Put the cooked onion and garlic into a food processor along with the roasted butternut squash.
  • Drain the butterbeans and add them to the food processor along with the freshly chopped coriander, basil and spinach plus 10ml of soy sauce.
  • Lastly, add the breadcrumbs.
  • Add a pinch of salt and pepper and pulse the mixture in the food processor until the ingredients are combined but still chunky so that the mixture retains a good texture.
  • Set the mixture aside and allow it to cool for approx 10 minutes.
  • Keeping the pastry on the parchment paper, cut it into one piece measuring 21x40cm.
  • Place the filling in the centre the whole way along the middle of the sheet of pastry.
  • Once the filling is on the pastry, wash one of the exposed sections of pastry with 5ml of almond milk. This will allow the pastry to stick together as you roll the sausage roll. Roll the bottom edge of the pastry over the filling and continue to roll the sausage roll the whole way over and round until the sausage roll is complete.
  • Cut the sausage roll in half and place it onto a baking tray lined with parchment paper.
  • Brush the whole outside of the sausage roll with almond milk.
  • Score the top of the “sausage roll” with the blunt side of a knife.
  • Place into the oven and bake at 200 degrees for 20 minutes.
  • After 20 minutes, turn the tray and cook for a further 20 minutes. Then roll the whole sausage roll over and remove the parchment paper from the bottom and cook for a further 10 minutes upside down. This will allow the bottom of the pastry to become crisp and ensure it is fully cooked.
  • Remove from the oven and allow to cool.
  • Cut into 6 equal portions and serve on a long wooden chopping board covered with a sheet of unbleached parchment paper.

Nutritional Info

(Per Portion / Slice)

  • Calories (kcal): 305
  • Protein: 6.9g
  • Fats: 14.7g
  • Of which saturates: 6.3g
  • Carbohydrates: 37.6g
  • Of which sugars: 4.4g
  • Fibre: 4.6g
  • Salt: 0.6g

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Seasoning: When, Where and How

Do you like to sprinkle a little seasoning over your dishes? I do and I bet you do too. Seasonings are there to enhance and compliment the flavour in your food, which will make the eating experience even more pleasurable, making it an important element in my cooking.

If you’ve been following my journey for a while, you will know that I’m all about the food with the natural flavour of food being my main focus. like my food to taste how it is supposed to, so when it comes to seasoning I keep things at a minimum.

The two most fundamental and widely used spices are salt and pepper. Typically, what people think of when speaking of salt and pepper is white, granulated salt and pre-ground black pepper–but these are far from the only kinds of salt and pepper that exist.

Salt Rocks

Rock salt is a great salt variation, the larger crystals carry a punch. Sea salt is cherished by many as a more natural, culinary salt. There’s also Kosher, iodized, pickling and black salt, amongst many more.

My absolute favourite is Himalayan pink salt–yep, it comes directly from the Himalayas and is pink. If you’re considering going pink then you’re onto a good thing; it’s a far better alternative to processed salt and by using just the right amount in your foodis actually very good for your health. Yup – salt can be healthy. Pink Himalayan sea salt contains over 84 minerals and trace elements, including: calcium, magnesium, potassium, copper and iron. So, it definitelydoesmore than enhance the favour of your food. You can also add it to hot baths to ease sore, tired muscles too!

Pepper Time

There is a vast assortment of peppers to explore ranging from your basic black pepper to chilli, jalapeño, habanero, cayenne to a white pepper, each with its own degree of spiciness and subtle flavour distinctions.

Spice Game

Let’s look a bit closer at other seasonings – we will explore blends shortly! Most individual seasonings are classed as herbs or spices.Herbs are usually the fresh or dried leaves of succulent plants that grow in particularly temperate climates. Spices tend to referto any seasoning derivedfrom the other parts of the plant besides the leaves, including the roots, stems, bark, seeds, fruit or buds.

Just to add a ‘sprinkle’ of confusion, chefs will use these two terms differently; spicescanbe used to describe all seasonings, including herbs.

Whereas herbs will have a somewhat milder flavour, spices are likely to be more pronounced. The most common cooking herbs willinclude: basil, oregano, marjoram, parsley, rosemary, thyme and dill. Common culinary spices include cinnamon, paprika (another pepper),turmeric, ginger, saffron and cumin. Ginger and garlic are both considered spices as well.

An interesting fact for you:

Did you know that some herbs and spices cancome from different parts of the same plant?

Dill seed and dill weed. Two other herbs, cilantro and coriander, both come from the same plant, but at two different stages in its growth cycle.

Many herbs and spices come from different varieties of the same plant, such as the mind-boggling array of types of basil, including Thai basil, Lemon basil, Cinnamon basil and Royal basil. What’s more, basil is just one kind of mint, of which there’s an even greater variety. Interestingly, although many herbs and spices, like licorice, fennel and star anise, have a very similar flavour but are actually not linked to one another at all!

Try It You Might Like It

Experiment! Different seasonings and blends applied to similar dishes may take you on entirely different culinary journeys.

When creating raw dishes, I have a strong focus on seasonings as this really enhances the flavour of dishes.

My main ones include:

– lemon juice

– tamari

– cinnamon

– vanilla

– nutritonal yeast

Are you a seasoned pro or are there specific ones that you stick to. Explore my free recipes on my blog or download my eBook for inspiration for dishes that will use a variety of seasonings.